We know that AI is disrupting a variety of industries. For example, automakers are trying to get away from human labor and may include self-driving cars and robots to do some of the work in the production line, and they are already replacing unionized assembly lines in industries like apparel and automotive parts.

The impact of AI can be as profound in the sex industry as in other sectors. As AI augments human efforts, porn performers are seeing their income rise (if only for a moment), according to the data summary the Center for Humane Technology conducted.

A few phrases reveal how these AI advances fit with the larger change taking place in porn and on demand adult entertainment:

Ashumanization. AI is allowing porn actors to appear more natural (for a moment) than ever before in porn. For example, the AI machines are allowing porn actors to act like “people.” This, in turn, is allowing AI-driven machines to deliver more high-quality images to directors who previously might have sent their actors to a porn movie warehouse with a sea of fake boobs and a few sweat socks.

Porn pays the bills. Deep learning has enabled porn to generate higher quality images and revenues with lower production costs, while also allowing for more realistic performances (with more realism being a key component of any good celebrity/star-studded porn scene). The Center for Humane Technology numbers show that porn actors who worked with artificial intelligence saw their wage rise 35 percent in one year.

The human element. AI technology has been introducing additional human elements to porn scenes, including drawing attention to body parts that have not been front and center in pornography before, bringing emotion to faces, and taking people into sexual scenes. This may sound like a dystopian view of the sex industry, but at least for now, at least we have bodies and faces to take pleasure in.

Author’s Note: Bernard Marr, a contributing writer at Forbes, has been one of the world’s most highly regarded voice and video editors for decades. He was inducted into the James MacMillan Award for Technical Excellence in Television in 2002.