Hanukkah, the Jewish Festival of Lights, celebrates the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem, which was destroyed by the Greeks in AD 70. Hanukkah commemorates the Jewish people's escape from the Turkish Empire, after which they scattered throughout the world and became known as the Maccabees. Today, Hanukkah is a celebration of light and gifts with the hope of freedom for all who follow the teachings of Judaism. Hanukkah provides a special opportunity to remember the events that played out in the second Temple during the ancient Second Temple when the Temple priests wrested from the Syrians the Holy Ark, the oil used to light the Maccabees' lamp. The miracle is that the holy oil lasted eight days instead of one day.

The main focus of Hanukkah celebrations is lighting a menorah for eight nights. The menorah is lit for Hanukkah on the first night of Hanukkah, which this year falls on Sunday, October 6. But before the actual menorah lighting on the first night, the people light candles on a Hanukkah menorah, often called a menorah light, which usually decorates a central communal space for the community. The menorah light is only used for Hanukkah. Traditionally, during Hanukkah, the holiday is marked with gift giving. Gifts are gifted to children or extended family members in exchange for a candle or menorah in the menorah. Appreciation for one of God's most sacred traditions, tradition or beauty is made evident with all the decorations, food and festivities. Hanukkah is therefore a time to remember all that is good in the world, in hopes of making things better in our lives.

Hanukkah foods are usually potato, carrot, pumpkin, green bean, green onion, gefilte fish, gingerbread, latkes (potato pancakes), jelly doughnuts and cakes. The Hanukkah period always falls between the end of Passover, which begins at sundown on April 20, and the beginning of the Feast of the Epiphany, which coincides with the holiday of Diwali, also known as Indian New Year. Diwali marks the harvest of light, which precedes the onset of winter darkness. Like Hanukkah, Diwali is a night celebrating a miracle. Food is eaten at night with a candles and song to mark the meal. One of the most popular foods is fried rice with butter, which represents a helping of light. Happy Hanukkah!

Most Hanukkah foods are boiled, boiled or deep-fried and can be found on the Sukkot (All Hallows Eve) and Hanukkah tables in Sukkot. On these festivals, the ovens are usually used for meals of appetizers, salads, beverages and desserts, which is a break from the fast. At Sukkot, most foods eaten are boiled, boiled or deep-fried and can be found on the Sukkot tables in Sukkot. On these festivals, the ovens are usually used for meals of appetizers, salads, beverages and desserts, which is a break from the fast. For more information about the season visit of hanukkah.com

Hanukkah

About 75 years ago, a group of Jewish military fighters called the Maccabees, in retribution for the destruction of the temple in Jerusalem, in 215 bc, defeated the Turks and returned the Maccabees' sacred Holy Temple to its owner. All of the temple's Holy artifacts were restored, but since the Maccabees forgot to bring the Holy oil, a miracle occurred, and the Holy Temple was lit with a lamp of one day's supply of oil. Hence the light of the menorah is one day's supply of oil. The miracle is that the Holy oil lasted eight days instead of one day.