Written by By Staff Writer

CNN

Bryan Cranston's Emmy-winning portrayal of lead character Walter White in the AMC drama series "Breaking Bad" has brought a ton of attention to the Boise-area retreat he owns with his wife, Robin. And, as its exterior shows, the 55-acre property is a bustling place. Cranston recently gave CNN Travel a tour of the property, taking in its self-described "Greek Revival" exterior, wood-paneled interiors and nature-filled grounds.

Originally built by Cranston's grandparents, the California-style, 15,500-square-foot home sits on two mountainside acres. Cranston, who bought the home in 2004 for $1.98 million, said a lot of the planning and work that went into the property was centered around what will look and feel great after Walter White leaves the show.

"We took the back-of-the-house exterior out," Cranston said, noting that did away with the large front window and screen. "We restored a lot of the leaded-glass windows. We re-looked at all the radiators and added a sloped roof where they used to be and where they've come down. The kitchen has restored luster. ... There was a trend to have something that was oversized, but we didn't want that."

One large guest house has been converted into an indoor swimming pool, while an outdoor kitchen is a favorite dining space for Cranston and his family. Cranston said he and his wife wanted a simple but welcoming experience and wanted to preserve the historic exterior.

"It is beautiful," he said. "And I hope that when it isn't our presence, it belongs to other folks. We have a great time here."

As with many homes in the area, the property was built with a deep appreciation for the outdoors in mind.

"We wanted to get the lighting and the sunlight and the texture of the stone," he said. "The trees, they tell us so much about the environment. ... It tells us the color of the land."

Cranston says he has never considered putting the property on the market, and he feels like people who live elsewhere for a short period of time in Idaho have a special connection to the place.

"We don't want to be in the spotlight," he said. "We have to be immersed in it. ... We really have an affinity for this."