Move over, Ken doll. We've got a new breed of cookie-cutter mannequin with an adorable likeness. And it has a cute moniker.

OK, I don't think that's a cute moniker. I mean, it's an awful nickname for a bear-hugging friendly beagle, but it's a catchy moniker nonetheless. Plus, there was a time when the name Genocide Camel could easily be used as a verb.

So if you're wondering who/what was behind the nickname, it's kind of an easy story. In 2009, Mom Truck Ads, a Japanese advertising agency, created a "Mugley Bot" who was designed to look like anything from a grizzly bear to a smiling Kiko crane to a bulldog to a funeral home car and even some Disneyland characters.

There is just something charming about the Evil Mugley Bot, and that's why I decided to take this opportunity to turn the character into a cute, fluffy inking.

The creative minds over at Idaho-based tattoo artist Kristie Starr, famous for performing adorable body art of puppies, animals and baby chicks with "cowsells and baby chicks" on her feet and her face, completely understand the meaning behind Genocide Camel. I mean, she and her team not only tattooed a bloody and goofy-looking genocide cartoon on her head, but she applied it like a regular tattoo. Just like I want a company to give me my own cool cartoon bunny to turn into a mascot for my company, Kristie said, "I really want Genocide Camel to be the next mascot for a music company." Yes, she's serious. She even has an idea of what they should name the cartoon "Don't call me Camel," as a nod to her name, "Kristie Crusher." No word yet if this artist will be an obstacle in San Diego Comic-Con's famous inking competition.

Since you probably know how I feel about genocide anyway, I'm guessing I'll win a ton of points with the nerd community for this:

Or, if that's a little too vulgar, I'll just give you the option of taking off the Tattoo.

The tattoo is water-based, stable and has a uniform appearance and texture. The execution of Genocide Camel allows the ability to wear only one arm and they only need 3 or 4 stitches in order to finish it.

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.com

Image: Kristie Starr/Idaho.