The president’s long-promised real border wall appears to be inching closer to completion. The new administration is revising the actual plan to build one from scratch — focusing on the wall portion of the boundary around Texas, according to a report by the New York Times. No public hearings for public comments are taking place, and the plan hasn’t been released to the public yet, despite calls by the environmental movement for the U.S. to adopt a precautionary approach to climate change.

“The administration is putting the future of the planet at risk by building something that will permanently change the ecosystem of one of the world’s largest rivers,” said the group Watershed Watch.

The sandbags — which were seen near the Mexican border wall — do not yet indicate a concrete wall, but they do indicate a final decision has been made. Supporters of the border wall say it will lead to higher pay for border agents, who currently must cross the real wall when they return to work from long stints of time off.

There has been a permanent, hard barrier in place along the 7-mile stretch between the manufacturing plant in Gilchrist, Texas, and the Rio Grande. Although the real wall plans haven’t been finalized, the construction would mean what is now a temporary border fence, which is actually a set of newly constructed fences, could be replaced, creating a long wait for motorists going over the bridge.

At the end of the 2018 fiscal year, there were 285 miles of the wall between the barrier and the actual physical border. The wall runs roughly 30 feet high, with six sets of concrete walls along with eight-feet high bollards, 11-foot high concrete fences and nine-foot high concrete slabs, according to newspaper articles from 1968. The SOBE, or Separate Bodily Integrity Evaluation, a 1993-2009 database provided by the Department of Homeland Security includes the following sections of border protection:

In McAllen, the wall begins to run diagonally from the right to the left side of the Rio Grande, with 35-foot highs and 30-foot backsides. The wall begins to run diagonally from the left to the right side of the Rio Grande, with 35-foot highs and 30-foot backsides.

Over the border on the New Mexico border, the wall runs diagonally from the southside of the river to the northside of the river, with 35-foot highs and 30-foot backsides.

Over the border in Sierra Blanca, which lies between El Paso and Kenedy, the wall runs diagonally from the west side of the river to the east side of the river, with 35-foot highs and 30-foot backsides.

Over the border in Devine, which lies between El Paso and Kenedy, the wall runs diagonally from the left side of the river to the right side of the river, with 35-foot highs and 30-foot backsides.

Over the border in Artesia, which lies between El Paso and Kenedy, the wall starts at the first side of the river, runs diagonally from the east side of the river to the west side of the river, and runs diagonally from the west side of the river to the north side of the river.

Over the border in Eagle Pass, which lies between El Paso and Kenedy, the wall starts from the west side of the river, runs diagonally from the west side of the river to the south side of the river, and runs diagonally from the south side of the river to the north side of the river.

Over the border in Eagle Pass, which lies between El Paso and Kenedy, the wall starts from the south side of the river, runs diagonally from the south side of the river to the north side of the river.

Over the border in Eagle Pass, which lies between El Paso and Kenedy, the wall starts from the south side of the river, runs diagonally from the south side of the river to the north side of the river.

Over the border in El Paso, which lies between El Paso and Kenedy, the wall starts from the south side of the river, runs diagonally from the south side of the river to the west side of the river, and runs diagonally from the west side of the river to the north side of the river.

Read the full story at The New York Times.

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