Written by By Steve McAnon, CNN

But it also warned that without the ambition it plans to show for the end of the decade, the UK will miss its targets.

The UK government was Thursday presented with a damning assessment of its plans to tackle climate change.

A report by the Department for Transport, which funded the research, suggested that an average of up to 116,000 Brits die prematurely each year because of harsh winters, and added that current gas prices are driving older and poorer people away from heating their homes.

The poor quality of British weather has also raised concerns about health.

A case study published by the University of Sheffield showed that people with depression who live in colder, colder areas are at a greater risk of incurring more long-term conditions.

This is why the commission's most recent report focused on how important it is to invest in new fossil fuel technologies such as renewable power, which must account for half of Britain's electricity supply by 2050.

The report claimed that the UK has to find a way to build a new offshore wind energy industry, after finding it cheaper to build renewable energy farms from existing sites than using new offshore wind parks, such as the 16.5 billion pound ($20.6 billion) scheme planned off the south coast of England.

The commission, led by former Environment Secretary Michael Gove, also released an assessment highlighting the importance of breaking the gas industry's stranglehold in the heating of homes and businesses, which account for nearly half of Britain's carbon footprint.

"Part of the case study ... found that people in rural areas had the poorest quality of life in the coldest areas of the country, making these places homes to start with, where people may be unable to heat their homes," said the report's authors.

"Climate change is not just bad for wildlife, it's bad for health, it's bad for property values."

'Living proof'

The commission said that the main barrier to Britain signing up to the targets outlined in the Paris Climate Change Agreement would be the UK's "nightmare" infrastructure waiting to be built -- and that the problems of how to solve Britain's energy woes can be traced back to Theresa May.

The commission said that the problems highlighted in its study -- the energy crisis, transportation problems, strain on public transport -- were "preventable," and could be overcome "through government action and market forces."

"Part of the case study ... found that people in rural areas had the poorest quality of life in the coldest areas of the country, making these places homes to start with, where people may be unable to heat their homes," said the report's authors.

Gove told reporters on Thursday that the government was now ready to tackle its energy woes head-on.

"We have to build an energy system that is going to be able to cope with this challenge in 20-30 years time and we are developing a whole series of initiatives to try and do that, not least the Electricity Market Reform, but also renewables, battery storage, energy efficiency and increasing the capacity of the electric car," he said.